Rachel Valdés Camejo

"Happily Ever After" moments
"Happily Ever After" moments

four photographs featuring the installation Happily Ever After from the Detrás del Muro Project, 11 ma Bienal de la Habana digital prints 47 1/4 x 31 1/2’’ (framed) 14 x 21’’ (individual image)

"Happily Ever After" moments
"Happily Ever After" moments

four photographs featuring the installation Happily Ever After from the Detrás del Muro Project, 11 ma Bienal de la Habana digital prints 47 1/4 x 31 1/2’’ (framed) 14 x 21’’ (individual image)

"Happily Ever After" moments
"Happily Ever After" moments

four photographs featuring the installation Happily Ever After from the Detrás del Muro Project, 11 ma Bienal de la Habana digital prints 47 1/4 x 31 1/2’’ (framed) 14 x 21’’ (individual image)

"Happily Ever After" moments
"Happily Ever After" moments

four photographs featuring the installation Happily Ever After from the Detrás del Muro Project, 11 ma Bienal de la Habana digital prints 47 1/4 x 31 1/2’’ (framed) 14 x 21’’ (individual image)

Artist Statement

I make my work into a research process that is linked to real experiences. At the same time, I try to get involved as much as I can in the experience of each one of my subjects, and this is where the production process of each project takes on more importance. The “how it’s done” largely becomes the essence of my work. 

 

In many pieces I use self-referentiality. I’m interested in feeling the different sensations inside the process of production, from the moment in which the work is being carried out to later, when it comes to take its position before the viewer, which is something completely different.

 

I start with what is real to create an element that turns out to be totally abstract but is also very connected to the purest reality, objects and images with ambiguous forms and questionable visuality. The repetition or mirror image of an element evokes a contemplative act of reflection on the past and the present; it is a way to materialize the passage of time. I often make references to the dilemma of the different realities that make up human life, the mental and physical, the objective and subjective, the real and ideal.

 

I do not think that it’s very important to maintain a constant aesthetic. I find it much more enriching to experiment with the different media that are part of the language of contemporary art. Many times, I give more priority to the essence of the concept itself and then translate that to a medium I consider more suggestive, be it a painting or an image or maybe an intervention in a space. 

 

The process for each artwork is different, and being part of that is what makes this so interesting and inspiring. The acts of painting—one’s posture and positioning while painting—are totally different from those of photography or installation, but to me, they are all closely related. They are all part of a translation of the ideas I have in my mind and that in the end I share with the viewer in each of my pieces. They are the connection between my inner world and the exterior world. I like to transport the viewer for a moment to that scene in that space in time when the piece was created, to a place where each artwork has a different meaning, feeling, and emotional charge.